Winter 1974

January 1, 1974

The Journal of San Diego History
SAN DIEGO HISTORICAL SOCIETY QUARTERLY
Winter 1974, Volume 20, Number 1

Original Articles

Rancho Guajome: A California Legacy Preserved
By Iris Wilson Engstrand & Thomas L. Scharf
Student Protest at its Best: San Diego, 1918
By Robert F. Heilbron
Tempting Temecula: The Making and Unmaking of a Southern California Community
By Kurt Van Horn

Book Reviews

San Diego History—In Advertisements

ON THE COVER: RANCHO GUAJOME

cover photo

“Some thirty miles north of San Diego, on the outskirts of the City of Vista, stands a beautiful and representative example of Spanish hacienda architecture dating from 1852. Amid a landscape of gently rolling hills, the spacious adobe residence of Rancho Guajome is a visible reminder of an era gone by—a time when much of California was divided into feudal-like estates and controlled by a select minority of Mexican and American rancheros. In past decades, faltering attempts have been made to preserve the steadily decaying ranch house so that it might once again serve as a symbol of united Hispanic and Anglo cultures.

Now, this objective has been realized. Recently acquired by the County of San Diego, Guajome will become a living landmark of California’s colorful rancho period. Ideally it will reflect the proud heritage and determined ambition of its most notable owners, Cave Johnson Cents and his wife Ysidora Bandini.”

Rancho Guajome is the subject of an article by Iris Wilson Engstrand and Thomas L. Scharf published in this issue of the Journal of San Diego History.

Cover Photo Courtesy E. ALAN COMSTOCK SAN DIEGO

 


This issue of the The Journal of San Diego History was scanned and proofread by volunteer George Bailey.