The Modern Exposition Buildings

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California State Building
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Palace of Water
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Hollywood Motion Picture Hall of Fame
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The Palace of Electricity
and Varied Industries

Requa would relate pre-Columbian Indian buildings and temples in the Southwest and Mexico to the modern era. A model existed in the earth colors, rounded contours, projecting vigas, and flat roof of the 1915 New Mexico Building. Requa, or his assistant Louis Bodmer, adapted features from this Pueblo-style building to the Hollywood Hall of Fame (today Palisades Building) and the Palisades Cafe (today no more). Since these buildings were a few steps from the New Mexico Building, it seemed appropriate to group them together in an identical style.

Despite attempts to harmonize buildings in the Palisades, the progression from pre-Columbian to modern architecture was awkward. It must be remembered that plans called for many Maya and Aztec structures that were not built. The final impression was not one of quality. Large structures, such as the California State, Varied Industries and Electricity and Water and Transportation Buildings, had wide blank walls decorated at the top and corners with thin geometric relief, vaguely suggestive of Maya and Mixtec origins. Requa claimed the horizontal massing corresponded with the massing of Maya and Aztec temples, but this was a guess by one who did not understand that Maya buildings were set on pedestals and Aztec temples on the summit of pyramids.